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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

are everywhere words to designate it, "love" is not universally 

known, and in many languages there are no words for "love." The 

failures to find love are often remarkable and unexpected. We may 

find it where we least expect it. Sexual desire became idealized 

(as Sergi has pointed out) even by some animals, especially 

birds, for when a bird pines to death for the loss of its mate 

this cannot be due to the uncomplicated instinct of sex, but must 

involve the interweaving of that instinct with the other elements 

of life to a degree which is rare even among the most civilized 

men. Some savage races seem to have no fundamental notion of 

love, and (like the American Nahuas) no primary word for it, 

while, on the other hand, in Quichua, the language of the ancient 

Peruvians, there are nearly six hundred combinations of the verb 

_munay_, to love. Among some peoples love seems to be confined to 

the women. Letourneau (_L'Evolution Litteraire_, p. 529) points 

out that in various parts of the world women have taken a leading 

part in creating erotic poetry. It may be mentioned in this 

connection that suicide from erotic motives among primitive 

peoples occurs chiefly among women (_Zeitschrift fuer 

Sozialwissenschaft_, 1899, p. 578). Not a few savages possess 

love-poems, as, for instance, the Suahali (Velten, in his _Prosa 

und Poesie der Suahali_, devotes a section to love-poems 

reproduced in the Suahali language). D.G. Brinton, in an 

interesting paper on "The Conception of Love in Some American 

Languages" (_Proceedings American Philosophical Society_, vol. 

xxiii, p. 546, 1886) states that the words for love in these 

languages reveal four main ways of expressing the conception: (1) 

inarticulate cries of emotion; (2) assertions of sameness or 

similarity; (3) assertions of conjunction or union; (4) 

assertions of a wish, desire, a longing. Brinton adds that "these 

same notions are those which underlie the majority of the words 

of love in the great Aryan family of languages." The remarkable 

fact emerges, however, that the peoples of Aryan tongue were slow 

in developing their conception of sexual love. Brinton remarks 

that the American Mayas must be placed above the peoples of early 

Aryan culture, in that they possessed a radical word for the joy 

of love which was in significance purely psychical, referring 

strictly to a mental state, and neither to similarity nor desire. 

Even the Greeks were late in developing any ideal of sexual love. 

This has been well brought out by E.F.M. Benecke in his 

_Antimachus of Colophon and the Position of Women in Greek 

Poetry_, a book which contains some hazardous assertions, but is 

highly instructive from the present point of view. The Greek 

lyric poets wrote practically no love poems at all to women 

before Anacreon, and his were only written in old age. True love 

for the Greeks was nearly always homosexual. The Ionian lyric 

poets of early Greece regarded woman as only an instrument of 

pleasure and the founder of the family. Theognis compares 

marriage to cattle-breeding; Alcman, when he wishes to be 

complimentary to the Spartan girls, speaks of them as his "female 

boy-friends." AEschylus makes even a father assume that his 

daughters will misbehave if left to themselves. There is no 

sexual love in Sophocles, and in Euripides it is only the women 

who fall in love. Benecke concludes (p. 67) that in Greece sexual 

love, down to a comparatively later period, was looked down on, 


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