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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

There are many who seek to conciliate prejudice and reason in their 

valuation of sex by drawing a sharp distinction between "lust" and "love," 

rejecting the one and accepting the other. It is quite proper to make such 

a distinction, but the manner in which it is made will by no means usually 

bear examination. We have to define what we mean by "lust" and what we 

mean by "love," and this is not easy if they are regarded as mutually 

exclusive. It is sometimes said that "lust" must be understood as meaning 

a reckless indulgence of the sexual impulse without regard to other 

considerations. So understood, we are quite safe in rejecting it. But that 

is an entirely arbitrary definition of the word. "Lust" is really a very 

ambiguous term; it is a good word that has changed its moral values, and 

therefore we need to define it very carefully before we venture to use it. 

Properly speaking, "lust" is an entirely colorless word[62] and merely 

means desire in general and sexual desire in particular; it corresponds to 

"hunger" or "thirst"; to use it in an offensive sense is much the same as 

though we should always assume that the word "hungry" had the offensive 

meaning of "greedy." The result has been that sensitive minds indignantly 

reject the term "lust" in connection with love.[63] In the early use of 

our language, "lust," "lusty," and "lustful" conveyed the sense of 

wholesome and normal sexual vigor; now, with the partial exception of 

"lusty," they have been so completely degraded to a lower sense that 

although it would be very convenient to restore them to their original 

and proper place, which still remains vacant, the attempt at such a 

restoration scarcely seems a hopeful task. We have so deeply poisoned the 

springs of feeling in these matters with mediaeval ascetic crudities that 

all our words of sex tend soon to become bespattered with filth; we may 

pick them up from the mud into which they have fallen and seek to purify 

them, but to many eyes they will still seem dirty. One result of this 

tendency is that we have no simple, precise, natural word for the love of 

the sexes, and are compelled to fall back on the general term, which is so 

extensive in its range that in English and French and most of the other 

leading languages of Europe, it is equally correct to "love" God or to 

"love" eating. 

 

 

Love, in the sexual sense, is, summarily considered, a synthesis of lust 

(in the primitive and uncolored sense of sexual emotion) and friendship. 

It is incorrect to apply the term "love" in the sexual sense to elementary 

and uncomplicated sexual desire; it is equally incorrect to apply it to 

any variety or combination of varieties of friendship. There can be no 

sexual love without lust; but, on the other hand, until the currents of 

lust in the organism have been so irradiated as to affect other parts of 

the psychic organism--at the least the affections and the social 

feelings--it is not yet sexual love. Lust, the specific sexual impulse, is 

indeed the primary and essential element in this synthesis, for it alone 

is adequate to the end of reproduction, not only in animals but in men. 

But it is not until lust is expanded and irradiated that it develops into 

the exquisite and enthralling flower of love. We may call to mind what 

happens among plants: on the one hand we have the lower organisms in which 

sex is carried on summarily and cryptogamically, never shedding any shower 

of gorgeous blossoms on the world, and on the other hand the higher plants 

among whom sex has become phanersgamous and expanded enormously into form 

and color and fragrance. 

 

While "lust" is, of course, known all over the world, and there 


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