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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

from the animal sphere of sex to a singularly great extent.[59] Breathing 

is an animal function and here we cannot compete with birds; locomotion is 

an animal function and here we cannot equal quadrupeds; we have made no 

notable advance in our circulatory, digestive, renal, or hepatic 

functions. Even as regards vision and hearing, there are many animals that 

are more keen-sighted than man, and many that are capable of hearing 

sounds that to him are inaudible. But there are no animals in whom the 

sexual instinct is so sensitive, so highly developed, so varied in its 

manifestations, so constantly alert, so capable of irradiating the highest 

and remotest parts of the organism. The sexual activities of man and woman 

belong not to that lower part of our nature which degrades us to the level 

of the "brute," but to the higher part which raises us towards all the 

finest activities and ideals we are capable of. It is true that it is 

chiefly in the mouths of a few ignorant and ill-bred women that we find 

sex referred to as "bestial" or "the animal part of our nature."[60] But 

since women are the mothers and teachers of the human race this is a piece 

of ignorance and ill-breeding which cannot be too swiftly eradicated. 

 

There are some who seem to think that they have held the balance evenly, 

and finally stated the matter, if they admit that sexual love may be 

either beautiful or disgusting, and that either view is equally normal and 

legitimate. "Listen in turn," Tarde remarks, "to two men who, one cold, 

the other ardent, one chaste, the other in love, both equally educated and 

large-minded, are estimating the same thing: one judges as disgusting, 

odious, revolting, and bestial what the other judges to be delicious, 

exquisite, ineffable, divine. What, for one, is in Christian phraseology, 

an unforgivable sin, is, for the other, the state of true grace. Acts that 

for one seem a sad and occasional necessity, stains that must be carefully 

effaced by long intervals of continence, are for the other the golden 

nails from which all the rest of conduct and existence is suspended, the 

things that alone give human life its value."[61] Yet we may well doubt 

whether both these persons are "equally well-educated and broad-minded." 

The savage feels that sex is perilous, and he is right. But the person who 

feels that the sexual impulse is bad, or even low and vulgar, is an 

absurdity in the universe, an anomaly. He is like those persons in our 

insane asylums, who feel that the instinct of nutrition is evil and so 

proceed to starve themselves. They are alike spiritual outcasts in the 

universe whose children they are. It is another matter when a man declares 

that, personally, in his own case, he cherishes an ascetic ideal which 

leads him to restrain, so far as possible, either or both impulses. The 

man, who is sanely ascetic seeks a discipline which aids the ideal he has 

personally set before himself. He may still remain theoretically in 

harmony with the universe to which he belongs. But to pour contempt on 

the sexual life, to throw the veil of "impurity" over it, is, as Nietzsche 

declared, the unpardonable sin against the Holy Ghost of Life. 

 

 

 


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