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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

 

It is scarcely necessary to remark that when we turn from 

Christianity to the other great world-religions, we do not 

usually meet with so ambiguous an attitude towards sex. The 

Mahommedans were as emphatic in asserting the sanctity of sex as 

they were in asserting physical cleanliness; they were prepared 

to carry the functions of sex into the future life, and were 

never worried, as Luther and so many other Christians have been, 

concerning the lack of occupation in Heaven. In India, although 

India is the home of the most extreme forms of religious 

asceticism, sexual love has been sanctified and divinized to a 

greater extent than in any other part of the world. "It seems 

never to have entered into the heads of the Hindu legislators," 

said Sir William Jones long since (_Works_, vol. ii, p. 311), 

"that anything natural could be offensively obscene, a 

singularity which pervades all their writings, but is no proof of 

the depravity of their morals." The sexual act has often had a 

religious significance in India, and the minutest details of the 

sexual life and its variations are discussed in Indian erotic 

treatises in a spirit of gravity, while nowhere else have the 

anatomical and physiological sexual characters of women been 

studied with such minute and adoring reverence. "Love in India, 

both as regards theory and practice," remarks Richard Schmidt 

(_Beitraege zur Indischen Erotik_, p. 2) "possesses an importance 

which it is impossible for us even to conceive." 

 

In Protestant countries the influence of the Reformation, by 

rehabilitating sex as natural, indirectly tended to substitute in popular 

feeling towards sex the opprobrium of sinfulness by the opprobrium of 

animality. Henceforth the sexual impulse must be disguised or adorned to 

become respectably human. This may be illustrated by a passage in Pepys's 

_Diary_ in the seventeenth century. On the morning after the wedding day 

it was customary to call up new married couples by music; the absence of 

this music on one occasion (in 1667) seemed to Pepys "as if they had 

married like dog and bitch." We no longer insist on the music, but the 

same feeling still exists in the craving for other disguises and 

adornments for the sexual impulse. We do not always realize that love 

brings its own sanctity with it. 

 

Nowadays indeed, whenever the repugnance to the sexual side of life 

manifests itself, the assertion nearly always made is not so much that it 

is "sinful" as that it is "beastly." It is regarded as that part of man 

which most closely allies him to the lower animals. It should scarcely be 

necessary to point out that this is a mistake. On whichever side, indeed, 

we approach it, the implication that sex in man and animals is identical 

cannot be borne out. From the point of view of those who accept this 

identity it would be much more correct to say that men are inferior, 

rather than on a level with animals, for in animals under natural 

conditions the sexual instinct is strictly subordinated to reproduction 

and very little susceptible to deviation, so that from the standpoint of 

those who wish to minimize sex, animals are nearer to the ideal, and such 

persons must say with Woods Hutchinson: "Take it altogether, our animal 

ancestors have quite as good reason to be ashamed of us as we of them." 

But if we look at the matter from a wider biological standpoint of 

development, our conclusion must be very different. 

 

So far from being animal-like, the human impulses of sex are among the 

least animal-like acquisitions of man. The human sphere of sex differs 


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