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PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

if we go back to origin, is due to other than Christian 

influence. Christianity came out of Judaism which had no sense of 

the impurity of marriage, for 'unclean' in the Old Testament 

simply means 'sacred.' The ascetic side of the religion of 

Christianity is no part of the religion of Christ as it came from 

the hands of its Founder, and the modern feeling on this matter 

is a lingering remnant of the heresy of the Manichaeans." I may 

add, however, that, as Northcote points out (_Christianity and 

Sex Problems_, p. 14), side by side in the Old Testament with the 

frank recognition of sexuality, there is a circle of ideas 

revealing the feeling of impurity in sex and of shame in 

connection with it. Christianity inherited this mixed feeling. It 

has really been a widespread and almost universal feeling among 

the ancient and primitive peoples that there is something impure 

and sinful in the things of sex, so that those who would lead a 

religious life must avoid sexual relationships; even in India 

celibacy has commanded respect (see, e.g., Westermarck, 

_Marriage_, pp. 150 et seq.). As to the original foundation of 

this notion--which it is unnecessary to discuss more fully 

here--many theories have been put forward; St. Augustine, in his 

_De Civitate Dei_, sets forth the ingenious idea that the penis, 

being liable to spontaneous movements and erections that are not 

under the control of the will, is a shameful organ and involves 

the whole sphere of sex in its shame. Westermarck argues that 

among nearly all peoples there is a feeling against sexual 

relationship with members of the same family or household, and as 

sex was thus banished from the sphere of domestic life a notion 

of its general impurity arose; Northcote points out that from the 

first it has been necessary to seek concealment for sexual 

intercourse, because at that moment the couple would be a prey to 

hostile attacks, and that it was by an easy transition that sex 

came to be regarded as a thing that ought to be concealed, and, 

therefore, a sinful thing. (Diderot, in his _Supplement au Voyage 

de Bougainville_, had already referred to this motive for 

seclusion as "the only natural element in modesty.") Crawley has 

devoted a large part of his suggestive work, _The Mystic Rose_, 

to showing that, to savage man, sex is a perilous, dangerous, and 

enfeebling element in life, and, therefore, sinful. 

 

It would, however, be a mistake to think that such men as St. Bernard and 

St. Odo of Cluny, admirably as they represented the ascetic and even the 

general Christian views of their own time, are to be regarded as 

altogether typical exponents of the genuine and primitive Christian view. 

So far as I have been able to discover, during the first thousand years of 

Christianity we do not find this concentrated intellectual and emotional 

ferocity of attack on the body; it only developed at the moment when, with 

Pope Gregory VII, mediaeval Christianity reached the climax of its conquest 

over the souls of European men, in the establishment of the celibacy of 

the secular clergy, and the growth of the great cloistered communities of 

monks in severely regulated and secluded orders.[51] Before that the 

teachers of asceticism were more concerned to exhort to chastity and 

modesty than to direct a deliberate and systematic attack on the whole 

body; they concentrated their attention rather on spiritual virtues than 

on physical imperfections. And if we go back to the Gospels we find little 


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