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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

formulae are no longer strong enough to control passion 

adequately, and that we are generating steam in a boiler that is 

cankered with rust. "The cure is not to cut off the passions, or 

to be weakly afraid of them, but to find a new, sound, healthy 

engine of general morality and common sense within which they 

will work" (Edward Carpenter, _Albany Review_, Sept., 1907). 

 

So far as I am aware, however, it was James Hinton who chiefly 

sought to make clear the possibility of a positive morality on 

the basis of nakedness, beauty, and sexual influence, regarded as 

dynamic forces which, when suppressed, make for corruption and 

when wisely used serve to inspire and ennoble life. He worked out 

his thoughts on this matter in MSS., written from about 1870 to 

his death two years later, which, never having been prepared for 

publication, remain in a fragmentary state and have not been 

published. I quote a few brief characteristic passages: "Is not," 

he wrote, "the Hindu refusal to see a woman eating strangely like 

ours to see one naked? The real sensuality of the thought is 

visibly identical.... Suppose, because they are delicious to eat, 

pineapples were forbidden to be seen, except in pictures, and 

about that there was something dubious. Suppose no one might have 

sight of a pineapple unless he were rich enough to purchase one 

for his particular eating, the sight and the eating being so 

indissolubly joined. What lustfulness would surround them, what 

constant pruriency, what stealing!... Miss ---- told us of her 

Syrian adventures, and how she went into a wood-carver's shop and 

he would not look at her; and how she took up a tool and worked, 

till at last he looked, and they both burst out laughing. Will it 

not be even so with our looking at women altogether? There will 

come a _work_--and at last we shall look up and both burst out 

laughing.... When men see truly what is amiss, and act with 

reason and forethought in respect to the sexual relations, will 

they not insist on the enjoyment of women's beauty by youths, and 

from the earliest age, that the first feeling may be of beauty? 

Will they not say, 'We must not allow the false purity, we must 

have the true.' The false has been tried, and it is not good 

enough; the power purely to enjoy beauty must be gained; 

attempting to do with less is fatal. Every instructor of youth 

shall say: 'This beauty of woman, God's chief work of beauty, it 

is good you see it; it is a pleasure that serves good; all beauty 

serves it, and above all this, for its office is to make you 

pure. Come to it as you come to daily bread, or pure air, or the 

cleansing bath: this is pure to you if you be pure, it will aid 

you in your effort to be so. But if any of you are impure, and 

make of it the feeder of impurity, then you should be ashamed and 

pray; it is not for you our life can be ordered; it is for men 

and not for beasts.' This must come when men open their eyes, and 

act coolly and with reason and forethought, and not in mere panic 

in respect to the sexual passion in its moral relations." 

 

 

FOOTNOTES: 

 

[40] Thus Athenaeus (Bk. xiii, Ch. XX) says: "In the Island of Chios it is 

a beautiful sight to go to the gymnasia and the race-courses, and to see 

the young men wrestling naked with the maidens who are also naked." 

 

[41] Augustine (_De civitate Dei_, lib. ii, cap. XIII) refers to the same 

point, contrasting the Romans with the Greeks who honored their actors. 

 

[42] See "The Evolution of Modesty" in the first volume of these 


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