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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

hall, by artificial light, in the presence of spectators who are 

themselves clothed, has no element of morality about it. Attempts 

have here and there been quietly made to cultivate a certain 

amount of mutual nakedness as between the sexes on remote country 

excursions. It is significant to find a record of such an 

experiment in Ungewitter's _Die Nacktheit_. In this case a party 

of people, men and women, would regularly every Sunday seek 

remote spots in woods or meadows where they would settle down, 

picnic, and enjoy games. "They made themselves as comfortable as 

possible, the men laying aside their coats, waistcoats, boots and 

socks; the women their blouses, skirts, shoes and stockings. 

Gradually, as the moral conception of nakedness developed in 

their minds, more and more clothing fell away, until the men wore 

nothing but bathing-drawers and the women only their chemises. In 

this 'costume' games were carried out in common, and a regular 

camp-life led. The ladies (some of whom were unmarried) would 

then lie in hammocks and we men on the grass, and the intercourse 

was delightful. We felt as members of one family, and behaved 

accordingly. In an entirely natural and unembarrassed way we gave 

ourselves up entirely to the liberating feelings aroused by this 

light- and air-bath, and passed these splendid hours in joyous 

singing and dancing, in wantonly childish fashion, freed from the 

burden of a false civilization. It was, of course, necessary to 

seek spots as remote as possible from high-roads, for fear of 

being disturbed. At the same time we by no means failed in 

natural modesty and consideration towards one another. Children, 

who can be entirely naked, may be allowed to take part in such 

meetings of adults, and will thus be brought up free from morbid 

prudery" (R. Ungewitter, _Die Nacktheit_, p. 58). 

 

No doubt it may be said that the ideal in this matter is the 

possibility of permitting complete nakedness. This may be 

admitted, and it is undoubtedly true that our rigid police 

regulations do much to artificially foster a concealment in this 

matter which is not based on any natural instinct. Dr. Shufeldt 

narrates in his _Studies of the Human Form_ that once in the 

course of a photographic expedition in the woods he came upon two 

boys, naked except for bathing-drawers, engaged in getting water 

lilies from a pond. He found them a good subject for his camera, 

but they could not be induced to remove their drawers, by no 

means out of either modesty or mock-modesty, but simply because 

they feared they might possibly be caught and arrested. We have 

to recognize that at the present day the general popular 

sentiment is not yet sufficiently educated to allow of public 

disregard for the convention of covering the sexual centres, and 

all attempts to extend the bounds of nakedness must show a due 

regard for this requirement. As concerns women, Valentin Lehr, of 

Freiburg, in Breisgau, has invented a costume (figured in 

Ungewitter's _Die Nacktheit_) which is suitable for either public 

water-baths or air-baths, because it meets the demand of those 

whose minimum requirement is that the chief sexual centres of the 

body should be covered in public, while it is otherwise fairly 

unobjectionable. It consists of two pieces, made of porous 

material, one covering the breasts with a band over the 

shoulders, and the other covering the abdomen below the navel and 

drawn between the legs. This minimal costume, while neither ideal 


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