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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

Plutarch, who was also a moralist, had already protested against it at the 

close of the Greek world: "By no means," he declared, "she who is modest 

clothes herself with modesty when she lays aside her tunic." "A woman may 

be naked," as Mrs. Bishop, the traveller, remarked to Dr. Baelz, in Japan, 

"and yet behave like a lady."[42] 

 

The question is complicated among ourselves because established 

traditions of rigid concealment have fostered a pruriency which is an 

offensive insult to naked modesty. In many lands the women who are 

accustomed to be almost or quite naked in the presence of their own people 

cover themselves as soon as they become conscious of the lustful 

inquisitive eyes of Europeans. Stratz refers to the prevalence of this 

impulse of offended modesty in Japan, and mentions that he himself failed 

to arouse it simply because he was a physician, and, moreover, had long 

lived in another land (Java) where also the custom of nakedness 

prevails.[43] So long as this unnatural prurience exists a free 

unqualified nakedness is rendered difficult. 

 

Modesty is not, however, the only natural impulse which has to be 

considered in relation to the custom of nakedness. It seems probable that 

in cultivating the practice of nakedness we are not merely carrying out a 

moral and hygienic prescription but allowing legitimate scope to an 

instinct which at some periods of life, especially in adolescence, is 

spontaneous and natural, even, it may be, wholesomely based in the 

traditions of the race in sexual selection. Our rigid conventions make it 

impossible for us to discover the laws of nature in this matter by 

stifling them at the outset. It may well be that there is a rhythmic 

harmony and concordance between impulses of modesty and impulses of 

ostentation, though we have done our best to disguise the natural law by 

our stupid and perverse by-laws. 

 

Stanley Hall, who emphasizes the importance of nakedness, remarks 

that at puberty we have much reason to assume that in a state of 

nature there is a certain instinctive pride and ostentation that 

accompanies the new local development, and quotes the observation 

of Dr. Seerley that the impulse to conceal the sexual organs is 

especially marked in young men who are underdeveloped, but not 

evident in those who are developed beyond the average. Stanley 

Hall (_Adolescence_, vol. ii, p. 97), also refers to the 

frequency with which not only "virtuous young men, but even 

women, rather glory in occasions when they can display the beauty 

of their forms without reserve, not only to themselves and to 

loved ones, but even to others with proper pretexts." 

 

Many have doubtless noted this tendency, especially in women, and 

chiefly in those who are conscious of beautiful physical 

development. Madame Celine Renooz believes that the tendency 

corresponds to a really deep-rooted instinct in women, little or 

not at all manifested in men who have consequently sought to 

impose artificially on women their own masculine conceptions of 

modesty. "In the actual life of the young girl to-day there is a 

moment when, by a secret atavism, she feels the pride of her sex, 

the intuition of her moral superiority and cannot understand why 

she must hide its cause. At this moment, wavering between the 

laws of Nature and social conventions, she scarcely knows if 

nakedness should, or should not, affright her. A sort of confused 

atavistic memory recalls to her a period before clothing was 

known, and reveals to her as a paradisaical ideal the customs of 

that human epoch" (Celine Renooz, _Psychologie Comparee de 


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