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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

naked in art is only stirred by the naked in nature as by a work 

of art." Enderlin, another teacher, speaking in the same sense 

(p. 58), points out that nakedness cannot act sexually or 

immorally on the child, since the sexual impulse has not yet 

become pronounced, and the earlier he is introduced to the naked 

in nature and in art, as a matter of course, the less likely are 

the sexual feelings to be developed precociously. The child thus, 

indeed, becomes immune to impure influences, so that later, when 

representations of the nude are brought before him for the object 

of provoking his wantonness, they are powerless to injure him. It 

is important, Enderlin adds, for familiarity with the nude in art 

to be learnt at school, for most of us, as Siebert remarks, have 

to learn purity through art. 

 

Nakedness in bathing, remarks Boelsche in his _Liebesleben in der 

Natur_ (vol. iii, pp. 139 et seq.), we already in some measure 

possess; we need it in physical exercises, at first for the sexes 

separately; then, when we have grown accustomed to the idea, 

occasionally for both sexes together. We need to acquire the 

capacity to see the bodies of individuals of the other sex with 

such self-control and such natural instinct that they become 

non-erotic to us and can be gazed at without erotic feeling. Art, 

he says, shows that this is possible in civilization. Science, he 

adds, comes to the aid of the same view. 

 

Ungewitter (_Die Nacktheit_, p. 57) also advocates boys and girls 

engaging in play and gymnastics together, entirely naked in 

air-baths. "In this way," he believes, "the gymnasium would 

become a school of morality, in which young growing things would 

be able to retain their purity as long as possible through 

becoming naturally accustomed to each other. At the same time 

their bodies would be hardened and developed, and the perception 

of beautiful and natural forms awakened." To those who have any 

"moral" doubts on the matter, he mentions the custom in remote 

country districts of boys and girls bathing together quite naked 

and without any sexual consciousness. Rudolf Sommer, similarly, 

in an excellent article entitled "Maedchenerziehung oder 

Menschenbildung?" (_Geschlecht und Gesellschaft_, Bd. i, Heft 3) 

advises that children should be made accustomed to each other's 

nakedness from an early age in the family life of the house or 

the garden, in games, and especially in bathing; he remarks that 

parents having children of only one sex should cultivate for 

their children's sake intimate relations with a family having 

children of like age of the opposite sex, so that they may grow 

up together. 

 

It is scarcely necessary to add that the cultivation of nakedness must 

always be conciliated with respect for the natural instincts of modesty. 

If the practice of nakedness led the young to experience a diminished 

reverence for their own or others' personalities the advantages of it 

would be too dearly bought. This is, in part, a matter of wholesome 

instinct, in part of wise training. We now know that the absence of 

clothes has little relation with the absence of modesty, such relation as 

there is being of the inverse order, for the savage races which go naked 

are usually more modest than those which wear clothes. The saying quoted 

by Herodotus in the early Greek world that "A woman takes off her modesty 

with her shift" was a favorite text of the Christian Fathers. But 


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