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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

 

 

Maria Lischnewska, one of the ablest advocates of the methodical 

enlightenment of children in matters of sex (op. cit.), clearly 

realizes that a sane attitude towards the body lies at the root 

of a sound education for life. She finds that the chief objection 

encountered in such education, as applied in the higher classes 

of schools, is "the horror of the civilized man at his own body." 

She shows that there can be no doubt that those who are engaged 

in the difficult task of working towards the abolition of that 

superstitious horror have taken up a moral task of the first 

importance. 

 

Walter Gerhard, in a thoughtful and sensible paper on the 

educational question ("Ein Kapitel zur Erziehungsfrage," 

_Geschlecht und Gesellschaft_, vol. i, Heft 2), points out that 

it is the adult who needs education in this matter--as in so many 

other matters of sexual enlightenment--considerably more than the 

child. Parents educate their children from the earliest years in 

prudery, and vainly flatter themselves that they have thereby 

promoted their modesty and morality. He records his own early 

life in a tropical land and accustomed to nakedness from the 

first. "It was not till I came to Germany when nearly twenty that 

I learnt that the human body is indecent, and that it must not be 

shown because that 'would arouse bad impulses.' It was not till 

the human body was entirely withdrawn from my sight and after I 

was constantly told that there was something improper behind 

clothes, that I was able to understand this.... Until then I had 

not known that a naked body, by the mere fact of being naked, 

could arouse erotic feelings. I had known erotic feelings, but 

they had not arisen from the sight of the naked body, but 

gradually blossomed from the union of our souls." And he draws 

the final moral that, if only for the sake of our children, we 

must learn to educate ourselves. 

 

Forel (_Die Sexuelle Frage_, p. 140), speaking in entirely the 

same sense as Gerhard, remarks that prudery may be either caused 

or cured in children. It may be caused by undue anxiety in 

covering their bodies and hiding from them the bodies of others. 

It may be cured by making them realize that there is nothing in 

the body that is unnatural and that we need be ashamed of, and by 

encouraging bathing of the sexes in common. He points out (p. 

512) the advantages of allowing children to be acquainted with 

the adult forms which they will themselves some day assume, and 

condemns the conduct of those foolish persons who assume that 

children already possess the adult's erotic feelings about the 

body. That is so far from being the case that children are 

frequently unable to distinguish the sex of other children apart 

from their clothes. 

 

At the Mannheim Congress of the German Society for Combating 

Venereal Diseases, specially devoted to sexual hygiene, the 

speakers constantly referred to the necessity of promoting 

familiarity with the naked body. Thus Eulenburg and Julian 

Marcuse (_Sexualpaedagogik_, p. 264) emphasize the importance of 

air-baths, not only for the sake of the physical health of the 

young, but in the interests of rational sexual training. Hoeller, 

a teacher, speaking at the same congress (op. cit., p. 85), after 

insisting on familiarity with the nude in art and literature, and 

protesting against the bowdlerising of poems for the young, 

continues: "By bathing-drawers ordinances no soul was ever yet 

saved from moral ruin. One who has learnt to enjoy peacefully the 


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