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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

Physiques et Dietetiques_ (1907) sets forth such methods 

comprehensively. In Germany sun-baths have become widely common; 

thus Lenkei (in a paper summarized in _British Medical Journal_, 

Oct. 31, 1908) prescribes them with much benefit in tuberculosis, 

rheumatic conditions, obesity, anaemia, neurasthenia, etc. He 

considers that their peculiar value lies in the action of light. 

Professor J.N. Hyde, of Chicago, even believes ("Light-Hunger in 

the Production of Psoriasis," _British Medical Journal_, Oct. 6, 

1906), that psoriasis is caused by deficiency of sunlight, and 

is best cured by the application of light. This belief, which has 

not, however, been generally accepted in its unqualified form, he 

ingeniously supports by the fact that psoriasis tends to appear 

on the most exposed parts of the body, which may be held to 

naturally receive and require the maximum of light, and by the 

absence of the disease in hot countries and among negroes. 

 

The hygienic value of nakedness is indicated by the robust health 

of the savages throughout the world who go naked. The vigor of 

the Irish, also, has been connected with the fact that (as Fynes 

Moryson's _Itinerary_ shows) both sexes, even among persons of 

high social class, were accustomed to go naked except for a 

mantle, especially in more remote parts of the country, as late 

as the seventeenth century. Where-ever primitive races abandon 

nakedness for clothing, at once the tendency to disease, 

mortality, and degeneracy notably increases, though it must be 

remembered that the use of clothing is commonly accompanied by 

the introduction of other bad habits. "Nakedness is the only 

condition universal among vigorous and healthy savages; at every 

other point perhaps they differ," remarks Frederick Boyle in a 

paper ("Savages and Clothes," _Monthly Review_, Sept., 1905) in 

which he brings together much evidence concerning the hygienic 

advantages of the natural human state in which man is "all face." 

 

It is in Germany that a return towards nakedness has been most 

ably and thoroughly advocated, notably by Dr. H. Pudor in his 

_Nackt-Cultur_, and by R. Ungewitter in _Die Nacktheit_ (first 

published in 1905), a book which has had a very large circulation 

in many editions. These writers enthusiastically advocate 

nakedness, not only on hygienic, but on moral and artistic 

grounds. Pudor insists more especially that "nakedness, both in 

gymnastics and in sport, is a method of cure and a method of 

regeneration;" he advocates co-education in this culture of 

nakedness. Although he makes large claims for 

nakedness--believing that all the nations which have disregarded 

these claims have rapidly become decadent--Pudor is less hopeful 

than Ungewitter of any speedy victory over the prejudices opposed 

to the culture of nakedness. He considers that the immediate task 

is education, and that a practical commencement may best be made 

with the foot which is specially in need of hygiene and exercise; 

a large part of the first volume of his book is devoted to the 

foot. 

 

As the matter is to-day viewed by those educationalists who are equally 

alive to sanitary and sexual considerations, the claims of nakedness, so 

far as concerns the young, are regarded as part alike of physical and 

moral hygiene. The free contact of the naked body with air and water and 

light makes for the health of the body; familiarity with the sight of the 


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