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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

moral efforts of our time are pointing in that direction." 

 

Stratz, as befits one who has worked so strenuously in the cause 

of human health and beauty, admirably sets forth the stage which 

we have now attained in this matter. After pointing out (_Die 

Frauenkleidung_, third edition, 1904, p. 30) that, in opposition 

to the pagan world which worshipped naked gods, Christianity 

developed the idea that nakedness was merely sexual, and 

therefore immoral, he proceeds: "But over all glimmered on the 

heavenly heights of the Cross, the naked body of the Saviour. 

Under that protection there has gradually disengaged itself from 

the confusion of ideas a new transfigured form of nakedness made 

free after long struggle. I would call this _artistic nakedness_, 

for as it was immortalized by the old Greeks through art, so also 

among us it has been awakened to new life by art. Artistic 

nakedness is, in its nature, much higher than either the natural 

or the sensual conception of nakedness. The simple child of 

Nature sees in nakedness nothing at all; the clothed man sees in 

the uncovered body only a sensual irritation. But at the highest 

standpoint man consciously returns to Nature, and recognizes that 

under the manifold coverings of human fabrication there is 

hidden the most splendid creature that God has created. One may 

stand in silent, worshipping wonder before the sight; another may 

be impelled to imitate and show to his fellow-man what in that 

holy moment he has seen. But both enjoy the spectacle of human 

beauty with full consciousness and enlightened purity of 

thought." 

 

It was not, however, so much on these more spiritual sides, but on the 

side of hygiene, that the nineteenth century furnished its chief practical 

contribution to the new attitude towards nakedness. 

 

Lord Monboddo, the Scotch judge, who was a pioneer in regard to 

many modern ideas, had already in the eighteenth century realized 

the hygienic value of "air-baths," and he invented that now 

familiar name. "Lord Monboddo," says Boswell, in 1777 (_Life of 

Johnson_, edited by Hill, vol. iii, p. 168) "told me that he 

awaked every morning at four, and then for his health got up and 

walked in his room naked, with the window open, which he called 

taking _an air-bath_." It is said also, I know not on what 

authority, that he made his beautiful daughters take an air-bath 

naked on the terrace every morning. Another distinguished man of 

the same century, Benjamin Franklin, used sometimes to work naked 

in his study on hygienic grounds, and, it is recorded, once 

affrighted a servant-girl by opening the door in an absent-minded 

moment, thus unattired. 

 

Rikli seems to have been the apostle of air-baths and sun-baths 

regarded as a systematic method. He established light-and 

air-baths over half a century ago at Trieste and elsewhere in 

Austria. His motto was: "Light, Truth, and Freedom are the motive 

forces towards the highest development of physical and moral 

health." Man is not a fish, he declared; light and air are the 

first conditions of a highly organized life. Solaria for the 

treatment of a number of different disordered conditions are now 

commonly established, and most systems of natural therapeutics 

attach prime importance to light and air, while in medicine 

generally it is beginning to be recognized that such influences 

can by no means be neglected. Dr. Fernand Sandoz, in his 

_Introduction a la Therapeutique Naturiste par les agents 


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