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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

regarded as a matter of convention. The nineteenth century man who 

encountered the spectacle of white limbs flashing in the sunlight no 

longer felt like the mediaeval ascetic that he was risking the salvation of 

his immortal soul or even courting the depravation of his morals; he 

merely felt that it was "indecent" or, in extreme cases, "disgusting." 

That is to say he regarded the matter as simply a question of conventional 

etiquette, at the worst, of taste, of aesthetics. In thus bringing down his 

repugnance to nakedness to so low a plane he had indeed rendered it 

generally acceptable, but at the same time he had deprived it of high 

sanction. His profound horror of nakedness was out of relation to the 

frivolous grounds on which he based it. 

 

We must not, however, under-rate the tenacity with which this 

horror of nakedness was held. Nothing illustrates more vividly 

the deeply ingrained hatred which the nineteenth century felt of 

nakedness than the ferocity--there is no other word for it--with 

which Christian missionaries to savages all over the world, even 

in the tropics, insisted on their converts adopting the 

conventional clothing of Northern Europe. Travellers' narratives 

abound in references to the emphasis placed by missionaries on 

this change of custom, which was both injurious to the health of 

the people and degrading to their dignity. It is sufficient to 

quote one authoritative witness, Lord Stanmore, formerly Governor 

of Fiji, who read a long paper to the Anglican Missionary 

Conference in 1894 on the subject of "Undue Introduction of 

Western Ways." "In the centre of the village," he remarked in 

quoting a typical case (and referring not to Fiji but to Tonga), 

"is the church, a wooden barn-like building. If the day be 

Sunday, we shall find the native minister arrayed in a 

greenish-black swallow-tail coat, a neckcloth, once white, and a 

pair of spectacles, which he probably does not need, preaching to 

a congregation, the male portion of which is dressed in much the 

same manner as himself, while the women are dizened out in old 

battered hats or bonnets, and shapeless gowns like bathing 

dresses, or it may be in crinolines of an early type. Chiefs of 

influence and women of high birth, who in their native dress 

would look, and do look, the ladies and gentlemen they are, are, 

by their Sunday finery, given the appearance of attendants upon 

Jack-in-the-Green. If a visit be paid to the houses of the town, 

after the morning's work of the people is over, the family will 

be found sitting on chairs, listless and uncomfortable, in a room 

full of litter. In the houses of the superior native clergy there 

will be a yet greater aping of the manners of the West. There 

will be chairs covered with hideous antimacassars, tasteless 

round worsted-work mats for absent flower jars, and a lot of ugly 

cheap and vulgar china chimney ornaments, which, there being no 

fireplace, and consequently no chimney-piece, are set out in 

order on a rickety deal table. The whole life of these village 

folk is one piece of unreal acting. They are continually asking 

themselves whether they are incurring any of the penalties 

entailed by infraction of the long table of prohibitions, and 

whether they are living up to the foreign garments they wear. 

Their faces have, for the most part, an expression of sullen 

discontent, they move about silently and joylessly, rebels in 

heart to the restrictive code on them, but which they fear to 


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