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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

mystery. 

 

Burton, in his _Anatomy of Melancholy_ (Part III, Sect II, Mem. 

II, Subs. IV), referring to the recommendations of Plato, adds: 

"But _Eusebius_ and _Theodoret_ worthily lash him for it; and 

well they might: for as one saith, the very sight of naked 

parts, _causeth enormous, exceeding concupiscences, and stirs up 

both men and women to burning lust_." Yet, as Burton himself adds 

further on in the same section of his work (Mem. V, Subs. III), 

without protest, "some are of opinion, that to see a woman naked, 

is able of itself to alter his affection; and it is worthy of 

consideration, saith _Montaigne_, the Frenchman, in his Essays, 

that the skilfullest masters of amorous dalliance appoint for a 

remedy of venereous passions, a full survey of the body." 

 

There ought to be no question regarding the fact that it is the 

adorned, the partially concealed body, and not the absolutely 

naked body, which acts as a sexual excitant. I have brought 

together some evidence on this point in the study of "The 

Evolution of Modesty." "In Madagascar, West Africa, and the 

Cape," says G.F. Scott Elliot (_A Naturalist in Mid-Africa_, p. 

36), "I have always found the same rule. Chastity varies 

inversely as the amount of clothing." It is now indeed generally 

held that one of the chief primary objects of ornament and 

clothing was the stimulation of sexual desire, and artists' 

models are well aware that when they are completely unclothed, 

they are most safe from undesired masculine advances. "A favorite 

model of mine told me," remarks Dr. Shufeldt (_Medical Brief_, 

Oct., 1904), the distinguished author of _Studies of the Human 

Form_, "that it was her practice to disrobe as soon after 

entering the artist's studio as possible, for, as men are not 

always responsible for their emotions, she felt that she was far 

less likely to arouse or excite them when entirely nude than when 

only semi-draped." This fact is, indeed, quite familiar to 

artists' models. If the conquest of sexual desire were the first 

and last consideration of life it would be more reasonable to 

prohibit clothing than to prohibit nakedness. 

 

When Christianity absorbed the whole of the European world this strict 

avoidance of even the sight of "the flesh," although nominally accepted by 

all as the desirable ideal, could only be carried out, thoroughly and 

completely, in the cloister. In the practice of the world outside, 

although the original Christian ideals remained influential, various pagan 

and primitive traditions in favor of nakedness still persisted, and were, 

to some extent, allowed to manifest themselves, alike in ordinary custom 

and on special occasions. 

 

How widespread is the occasional or habitual practice of 

nakedness in the world generally, and how entirely concordant it 

is with even a most sensitive modesty, has been set forth in "The 

Evolution of Modesty," in vol. i of these _Studies_. 

 

Even during the Christian era the impulse to adopt nudity, often 

with the feeling that it was an especially sacred practice, has 

persisted. The Adamites of the second century, who read and 

prayed naked, and celebrated the sacrament naked, according to 

the statement quoted by St. Augustine, seem to have caused little 

scandal so long as they only practiced nudity in their sacred 

ceremonies. The German Brethren of the Free Spirit, in the 

thirteenth century, combined so much chastity with promiscuous 

nakedness that orthodox Catholics believed they were assisted by 


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