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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

This point of view was vigorously championed by the speakers on 

sexual education at the Third Congress of the German Gesellschaft 

zur Bekaempfung der Geschlechtskrankheiten in 1907. Thus Enderlin, 

speaking as a headmaster, protested against the custom of 

bowdlerizing poems and folk-songs for the use of children, and 

thus robbing them of the finest introduction to purified sexual 

impulses and the highest sphere of emotion, while at the same 

time they are recklessly exposed to the "psychic infection" of 

the vulgar comic papers everywhere exposed for sale. "So long as 

children are too young to respond to erotic poetry it cannot hurt 

them; when they are old enough to respond it can only benefit 

them by opening to them the highest and purest channels of human 

emotion" (_Sexualpaedagogik_, p. 60). Professor Schaefenacker (id., 

p. 98) expresses himself in the same sense, and remarks that "the 

method of removing from school-books all those passages which, in 

the opinion of short-sighted and narrow-hearted schoolmasters, 

are unsuited for youth, must be decisively condemned." Every 

healthy boy and girl who has reached the age of puberty may be 

safely allowed to ramble in any good library, however varied its 

contents. So far from needing guidance they will usually show a 

much more refined taste than their elders. At this age, when the 

emotions are still virginal and sensitive, the things that are 

realistic, ugly, or morbid, jar on the young spirit and are cast 

aside, though in adult life, with the coarsening of mental 

texture which comes of years and experience, this repugnance, 

doubtless by an equally sound and natural instinct, may become 

much less acute. 

 

Ellen Key in Ch. VI of her _Century of the Child_ well summarizes 

the reasons against the practice of selecting for children books 

that are "suitable" for them, a practice which she considers one 

of the follies of modern education. The child should be free to 

read all great literature, and will himself instinctively put 

aside the things he is not yet ripe for. His cooler senses are 

undisturbed by scenes that his elders find too exciting, while 

even at a later stage it is not the nakedness of great 

literature, but much more the method of the modern novel, which 

is likely to stain the imagination, falsify reality and injure 

taste. It is concealment which misleads and coarsens, producing a 

state of mind in which even the Bible becomes a stimulus to the 

senses. The writings of the great masters yield the imaginative 

food which the child craves, and the erotic moment in them is too 

brief to be overheating. It is the more necessary, Ellen Key 

remarks, for children to be introduced to great literature, since 

they often have little opportunity to occupy themselves with it 

in later life. Many years earlier Ruskin, in _Sesame and Lilies_, 

had eloquently urged that even young girls should be allowed to 

range freely in libraries. 

 

What has been said about literature applies equally to art. Art, as well 

as literature, and in the same indirect way, can be made a valuable aid in 

the task of sexual enlightenment and sexual hygiene. Modern art may, 

indeed, for the most part, be ignored from this point of view, but 

children cannot be too early familiarized with the representations of the 

nude in ancient sculpture and in the paintings of the old masters of the 

Italian school. In this way they may be immunized, as Enderlin expresses 

it, against those representations of the nude which make an appeal to the 


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