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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

unnecessary but mischievous. It is now more necessary to show that women 

have special needs just as men have special needs, and that it is as bad 

for women, and therefore, for the world, to force them to accept the 

special laws and limitations of men as it would be bad for men, and 

therefore, for the world, to force men to accept the special laws and 

limitations of women. Each sex must seek to reach the goal by following 

the laws of its own nature, even although it remains desirable that, both 

in the school and in the world, they should work so far as possible side 

by side. The great fact to be remembered always is that, not only are 

women, in physical size and physical texture, slighter and finer than men, 

but that to an extent altogether unknown among men, their centre of 

gravity is apt to be deflected by the series of rhythmic sexual curves on 

which they are always living. They are thus more delicately poised and any 

kind of stress or strain--cerebral, nervous, or muscular--is more likely 

to produce serious disturbance and requires an accurate adjustment to 

their special needs. 

 

The fact that it is stress and strain in general, and not 

necessarily educational studies, that are injurious to adolescent 

women, is sufficiently proved, if proof is necessary, by the fact 

that sexual arrest, and physical or nervous breakdown, occur with 

extreme frequency in girls who work in shops or mills, even in 

girls who have never been to school at all. Even excesses in 

athletics--which now not infrequently occur as a reaction against 

woman's indifference to physical exercise--are bad. Cycling is 

beneficial for women who can ride without pain or discomfort, 

and, according to Watkins, it is even beneficial in many diseased 

and disordered pelvic conditions, but excessive cycling is evil 

in its results on women, more especially by inducing rigidity of 

the perineum to an extent which may even prevent childbirth and 

necessitate operation. I may add that the same objection applies 

to much horse-riding. In the same way everything which causes 

shocks to the body is apt to be dangerous to women, since in the 

womb they possess a delicately poised organ which varies in 

weight at different times, and it would, for instance, be 

impossible to commend football as a game for girls. "I do not 

believe," wrote Miss H. Ballantine, Director of Vassar College 

Gymnasium, to Prof. W. Thomas (_Sex and Society_, p. 22) "women 

can ever, no matter what the training, approach men in their 

physical achievements; and," she wisely adds, "I see no reason 

why they should." There seem, indeed, as has already been 

indicated, to be reasons why they should not, especially if they 

look forward to becoming mothers. I have noticed that women who 

have lived a very robust and athletic outdoor life, so far from 

always having the easy confinements which we might anticipate, 

sometimes have very seriously difficult times, imperilling the 

life of the child. On making this observation to a distinguished 

obstetrician, the late Dr. Engelmann, who was an ardent advocate 

of physical exercise for women (in e.g. his presidential address, 

"The Health of the American Girl," _Transactions Southern 

Surgical and Gynaecological Association_, 1890), he replied that 

he had himself made the same observation, and that instructors in 

physical training, both in America and England, had also told him 

of such cases among their pupils. "I hold," he wrote, "precisely 


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