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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

Obstetrics_, Nov., 1907), emphasizes the admirable results 

obtained by moderate physical exercise for young women, and in 

training them to care for their bodies and to rest their nervous 

systems, while Dr. Charlotte Brown, of San Francisco, rightly 

insists on the establishment in all towns and villages alike of 

outdoor gymnastic fields for women and girls, and of a building, 

in connection with every large school, for training in physical, 

manual, and domestic science. The provision of special 

playgrounds is necessary where the exercising of girls is so 

unfamiliar as to cause an embarrassing amount of attention from 

the opposite sex, though when it is an immemorial custom it can 

be carried out on the village green without attracting the 

slightest attention, as I have seen in Spain, where one cannot 

fail to connect it with the physical vigor of the women. In boys' 

schools games are not only encouraged, but made compulsory; but 

this is by no means a universal rule in girls' schools. It is not 

necessary, and is indeed highly undesirable, that the games 

adopted should be those of boys. In England especially, where the 

movements of women are so often marked by awkwardness, angularity 

and lack of grace, it is essential that nothing should be done to 

emphasize these characteristics, for where vigor involves 

violence we are in the presence of a lack of due neuro-muscular 

cooerdination. Swimming, when possible, and especially some forms 

of dancing, are admirably adapted to develop the bodily movements 

of women both vigorously and harmoniously (see, e.g., Havelock 

Ellis, _Man and Woman_, Ch. VII). At the International Congress 

of School Hygiene in 1907 (see, e.g., _British Medical Journal_, 

Aug. 24, 1907) Dr. L.H. Gulick, formerly Director of Physical 

Training in the Public Schools of New York City, stated that 

after many experiments it had been found in the New York 

elementary and high schools that folk-dancing constituted the 

very best exercise for girls. "The dances selected involved many 

contractions of the large muscular masses of the body and had 

therefore a great effect on respiration, circulation and 

nutrition. Such movements, moreover, when done as dances, could 

be carried on three or four times as long without producing 

fatigue as formal gymnastics. Many folk-dances were imitative, 

sowing and reaping dance, dances expressing trade movements (the 

shoemaker's dance), others illustrating attack and defense, or 

the pursuit of game. Such neuro-muscular movements were racially 

old and fitted in with man's expressive life, and if it were 

accepted that the folk-dances really expressed an epitome of 

man's neuro-muscular history, as distinguished from mere 

permutation of movements, the folk-dance combinations should be 

preferred on these biological grounds to the unselected, or even 

the physiologically selected. From the aesthetic point of view the 

sense of beauty as shown in dancing was far commoner than the 

power to sing, paint or model." 

 

It must always be remembered that in realizing the especial demands of 

woman's nature, we do not commit ourselves to the belief that higher 

education is unfitted for a woman. That question may now be regarded as 

settled. There is therefore no longer any need for the feverish anxiety of 

the early leaders of feminine education to prove that girls can be 

educated exactly as if they were boys, and yield at least as good 


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