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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

 

"It seems evident," A.E. Giles concludes ("Some Points of 

Preventive Treatment in the Diseases of Women," _The Hospital_, 

April 10, 1897) "that dysmenorrhoea might be to a large extent 

prevented by attention to general health and education. Short 

hours of work, especially of standing; plenty of outdoor 

exercise--tennis, boating, cycling, gymnastics, and walking for 

those who cannot afford these; regularity of meals and food of 

the proper quality--not the incessant tea and bread and butter 

with variation of pastry; the avoidance of overexertion and 

prolonged fatigue; these are some of the principal things which 

require attention. Let girls pursue their study, but more 

leisurely; they will arrive at the same goal, but a little 

later." The benefit of allowing free movement and exercise to the 

whole body is undoubtedly very great, both as regards the sexual 

and general physical health and the mental balance; in order to 

insure this it is necessary to avoid heavy and constricting 

garments, more especially around the chest, for it is in 

respiratory power and chest expansion more than in any other 

respect that girls fall behind boys (see, e.g., Havelock Ellis, 

_Man and Woman_, Ch. IX). In old days the great obstacle to the 

free exercise of girls lay in an ideal of feminine behavior which 

involved a prim restraint on every natural movement of the body. 

At the present day that ideal is not so fervently preached as of 

old, but its traditional influence still to some extent persists, 

while there is the further difficulty that adequate time and 

opportunity and encouragement are by no means generally afforded 

to girls for the cultivation and training of the romping 

instincts which are really a serious part of education, for it is 

by such free exercise of the whole body that the neuro-muscular 

system, the basis of all vital activity, is built up. The neglect 

of such education is to-day clearly visible in the structure of 

our women. Dr. F. May Dickinson Berry, Medical Examiner to the 

Technical Education Board of the London County Council, found 

(_British Medical Journal_, May 28, 1904) among over 1,500 girls, 

who represent the flower of the schools, since they had obtained 

scholarships enabling them to proceed to higher grade schools, 

that 22 per cent, presented some degree, not always pronounced, 

of lateral curvature of the spine, though such cases were very 

rare among the boys. In the same way among a very similar class 

of select girls at the Chicago Normal School, Miss Lura Sanborn 

(_Doctors' Magazine_, Dec., 1900) found 17 per cent, with spinal 

curvature, in some cases of a very pronounced degree. There is no 

reason why a girl should not have as straight a back as a boy, 

and the cause can only lie in the defective muscular development 

which was found in most of the cases, sometimes accompanied by 

anaemia. Here and there nowadays, among the better social classes, 

there is ample provision for the development of muscular power in 

girls, but in any generalized way there is no adequate 

opportunity for such exercise, and among the working class, above 

all, in the section of it which touches the lower middle class, 

although their lives are destined to be filled with a constant 

strain on the neuro-muscular system from work at home or in 

shops, etc., there is usually a minimum of healthy exercise and 

physical development. Dr. W.A.B. Sellman, of Baltimore ("Causes 

of Painful Menstruation in Unmarried Women," _American Journal 


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