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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

regarding the onset of menstruation in nearly one thousand women 

he found that "25 per cent. were totally unprepared for its 

appearance; that thirteen out of the twenty-five were much 

frightened, screamed, or went into hysterical fits; and that six 

out of the thirteen thought themselves wounded and washed with 

cold water. Of those frightened ... the general health was 

seriously impaired." 

 

Engelmann, after stating that his experience in America was 

similar to Tilt's in England, continues ("The Health of the 

American Girl," _Transactions of the Southern Surgical and 

Gynaecological Society_, 1890): "To innumerable women has fright, 

nervous and emotional excitement, exposure to cold, brought 

injury at puberty. What more natural than that the anxious girl, 

surprised by the sudden and unexpected loss of the precious 

life-fluid, should seek to check the bleeding wound--as she 

supposes? For this purpose the use of cold washes and 

applications is common, some even seek to stop the flow by a cold 

bath, as was done by a now careful mother, who long lay at the 

point of death from the result of such indiscretion, and but 

slowly, by years of care, regained her health. The terrible 

warning has not been lost, and mindful of her own experience she 

has taught her children a lesson which but few are fortunate 

enough to learn--the individual care during periods of functional 

activity which is needful for the preservation of woman's 

health." 

 

In a study of one hundred and twenty-five American high school 

girls Dr. Helen Kennedy refers to the "modesty" which makes it 

impossible even for mothers and daughters to speak to each other 

concerning the menstrual functions. "Thirty-six girls in this 

high school passed into womanhood with no knowledge whatever, 

from a proper source, of all that makes them women. Thirty-nine 

were probably not much wiser, for they stated that they had 

received some instruction, but had not talked freely on the 

matter. From the fact that the curious girl did not talk freely 

on what naturally interested her, it is possible she was put off 

with a few words as to personal care, and a reprimand for her 

curiosity. Less than half of the girls felt free to talk with 

their mothers of this most important matter!" (Helen Kennedy, 

"Effects of High School Work upon Girls During Adolescence," 

_Pedagogical Seminary_, June, 1896.) 

 

The same state of things probably also prevails in other 

countries. Thus, as regards France, Edmond de Goncourt in 

_Cherie_ (pp. 137-139) described the terror of his young heroine 

at the appearance of the first menstrual period for which she 

had never been prepared. He adds: "It is very seldom, indeed, 

that women speak of this eventuality. Mothers fear to warn their 

daughters, elder sisters dislike confidences with their younger 

sisters, governesses are generally mute with girls who have no 

mothers or sisters." 

 

Sometimes this leads to suicide or to attempts at suicide. Thus a 

few years ago the case was reported in the French newspapers of a 

young girl of fifteen, who threw herself into the Seine at 

Saint-Ouen. She was rescued, and on being brought before the 

police commissioner said that she had been attacked by an 

"unknown disease" which had driven her to despair. Discreet 

inquiry revealed that the mysterious malady was one common to all 

women, and the girl was restored to her insufficiently punished 

parents. 

 

 

 


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