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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

sex. The parents usually imagined that their children were 

absolutely ignorant of these matters, and were astonished to 

realize their mistake; "parents do not know their children, nor 

have they the least idea of what their children know, or what 

their children talk about and do when away from them." The 

parents guilty of this neglect to instruct their children, are, 

Lindsey declares, traitors to their children. From his own 

experience he judges that nine-tenths of the girls who "go 

wrong," whether or not they sink in the world, do so owing to the 

inattention of their parents, and that in the case of most 

prostitutes the mischief is really done before the age of twelve; 

"every wayward girl I have talked to has assured me of this 

truth." He considers that nine-tenths of school-boys and 

school-girls, in town or country, are very inquisitive regarding 

matters of sex, and, to his own amazement, he has found that in 

the girls this is as marked as in the boys. 

 

It is the business of the girl's mother, at least as much as of the boy's, 

to watch over her child from the earliest years and to win her confidence 

in all the intimate and personal matters of sex. With these aspects the 

school cannot properly meddle. But in matters of physical sexual hygiene, 

notably menstruation, in regard to which all girls stand on the same 

level, it is certainly the duty of the teacher to take an actively 

watchful part, and, moreover, to direct the general work of education 

accordingly, and to ensure that the pupil shall rest whenever that may 

seem to be desirable. This is part of the very elements of the education 

of girls. To disregard it should disqualify a teacher from taking further 

share in educational work. Yet it is constantly and persistently 

neglected. A large number of girls have not even been prepared by their 

mothers or teachers for the first onset of the menstrual flow, sometimes 

with disastrous results both to their bodily and mental health.[26] 

 

"I know of no large girl's school," wrote a distinguished 

gynaecologist, Sir W.S. Playfair ("Education and Training of Girls 

at Puberty," _British Medical Journal_, Dec. 7, 1895), "in which 

the absolute distinction which exists between boys and girls as 

regards the dominant menstrual function is systematically cared 

for and attended to. Indeed, the feeling of all schoolmistresses 

is distinctly antagonistic to such an admission. The contention 

is that there is no real difference between an adolescent male 

and female, that what is good for one is good for the other, and 

that such as there is is due to the evil customs of the past 

which have denied to women the ambitions and advantages open to 

men, and that this will disappear when a happier era is 

inaugurated. If this be so, how comes it that while every 

practical physician of experience has seen many cases of anaemia 

and chlorosis in girls, accompanied by amenorrhaea or menorrhagia, 

headaches, palpitations, emaciation, and all the familiar 

accompaniments of breakdown, an analogous condition in a 

school-boy is so rare that it may well be doubted if it is ever 

seen at all?" 

 

It is, however, only the excuses for this almost criminal 

negligence, as it ought to be considered, which are new; the 

negligence itself is ancient. Half a century earlier, before the 

new era of feminine education, another distinguished 

gynaecologist, Tilt (_Elements of Health and Principles of Female 

Hygiene_, 1852, p. 18) stated that from a statistical inquiry 


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