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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

wissenden Keuschheit?" _Geschlecht und Gesellschaft_, Jahrgang I, 

Heft 4), reproducing some of her talks with her nine-year old 

son, from the time that he first asked her where children came 

from, shows how she began with telling him about flowers, to pass 

on to fish and birds, and finally to the facts of human 

pregnancy, showing him pictures from an obstetrical manual of the 

child in its mother's body. It may be added that the advisability 

of beginning the sex teaching of children with the facts of 

botany was repeatedly emphasized by various speakers at the 

special meeting of the German Congress for Combating Venereal 

Disease devoted to the subject of sexual instruction 

(_Sexualpaedagogik_, especially pp. 36, 47, 76). 

 

The transition from botany to the elementary zooelogy of the lower animals, 

to human anatomy and physiology, and to the science of anthropology based 

on these, is simple and natural. It is not likely to be taken in detail 

until the age of puberty. Sex enters into all these subjects and should 

not be artificially excluded from them in the education of either boys or 

girls. The text-books from which the sexual system is entirely omitted 

ought no longer to be tolerated. The nature and secretion of the 

testicles, the meaning of the ovaries and of menstruation, as well as the 

significance of metabolism and the urinary excretion, should be clear in 

their main lines to all boys and girls who have reached the age of 

puberty. 

 

At puberty there arises a new and powerful reason why boys and girls 

should receive definite instruction in matters of sex. Before that age it 

is possible for the foolish parent to imagine that a child may be 

preserved in ignorant innocence.[25] At puberty that belief is obviously 

no longer possible. The efflorescence of puberty with the development of 

the sexual organs, the appearance of hair in unfamiliar places, the 

general related organic changes, the spontaneous and perhaps alarming 

occurrence in boys of seminal emissions, and in girls of menstruation, the 

unaccustomed and sometimes acute recognition of sexual desire accompanied 

by new sensations in the sexual organs and leading perhaps to 

masturbation; all these arouse, as we cannot fail to realize, a new 

anxiety in the boy's or girl's mind, and a new curiosity, all the more 

acute in many cases because it is carefully concealed as too private, and 

even too shameful, to speak of to anyone. In boys, especially if of 

sensitive temperament, the suffering thus caused may be keen and 

prolonged. 

 

 

A doctor of philosophy, prominent in his profession, wrote to 

Stanley Hall (_Adolescence_, vol. i, p. 452): "My entire youth, 

from six to eighteen, was made miserable from lack of knowledge 

that any one who knew anything of the nature of puberty might 

have given; this long sense of defect, dread of operation, shame 

and worry, has left an indelible mark." There are certainly many 

men who could say the same. Lancaster ("Psychology and Pedagogy 

of Adolescence," _Pedagogical Seminary_, July, 1897, pp. 123-5) 

speaks strongly regarding the evils of ignorance of sexual 

hygiene, and the terrible fact that millions of youths are always 

in the hands of quacks who dupe them into the belief that they 

are on the road to an awful destiny merely because they have 

occasional emissions during sleep. "This is not a light matter," 

Lancaster declares. "It strikes at the very foundation of our 

inmost life. It deals with the reproductory part of our natures, 

and must have a deep hereditary influence. It is a natural result 


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