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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

natural and inevitable part of general physiology. 

 

This objection to animal physiology by no means applies, however, to 

botany. There can be little doubt that botany is of all the natural 

sciences that which best admits of this incidental instruction in the 

fundamental facts of sex, when we are concerned with children below the 

age of puberty. There are at least two reasons why this should be so. In 

the first place botany really presents the beginnings of sex, in their 

most naked and essential forms; it makes clear the nature, origin, and 

significance of sex. In the second place, in dealing with plants the facts 

of sex can be stated to children of either sex or any age quite plainly 

and nakedly without any reserve, for no one nowadays regards the botanical 

facts of sex as in any way offensive. The expounder of sex in plants also 

has on his side the advantage of being able to assert, without question, 

the entire beauty of the sexual process. He is not confronted by the 

ignorance, bad education, and false associations which have made it so 

difficult either to see or to show the beauty of sex in animals. From the 

sex-life of plants to the sex-life of the lower animals there is, however, 

but a step which the teacher, according to his discretion, may take. 

 

An early educational authority, Salzmann, in 1785 advocated the 

sexual enlightenment of children by first teaching them botany, 

to be followed by zooelogy. In modern times the method of 

imparting sex knowledge to children by means, in the first place, 

of botany, has been generally advocated, and from the most 

various quarters. Thus Marro (_La Puberta_, p. 300) recommends 

this plan. J. Hudrey-Menos ("La Question du Sexe dans 

l'Education," _Revue Socialiste_, June, 1895), gives the same 

advice. Rudolf Sommer, in a paper entitled "Maedchenerziehung oder 

Menschenbildung?" (_Geschlecht und Gesellschaft_, Jahrgang I, 

Heft 3) recommends that the first introduction of sex knowledge 

to children should be made by talking to them on simple natural 

history subjects; "there are endless opportunities," he remarks, 

"over a fairy-tale, or a walk, or a fruit, or an egg, the sowing 

of seed or the nest-building of birds." Canon Lyttelton 

(_Training of the Young in Laws of Sex_, pp. 74 et seq.) advises 

a somewhat similar method, though laying chief stress on personal 

confidence between the child and his mother; "reference is made 

to the animal world just so far as the child's knowledge extends, 

so as to prevent the new facts from being viewed in isolation, 

but the main emphasis is laid on his feeling for his mother and 

the instinct which exists in nearly all children of reverence due 

to the maternal relation;" he adds that, however difficult the 

subject may seem, the essential facts of paternity must also be 

explained to boys and girls alike. Keyes, again (_New York 

Medical Journal_, Feb. 10, 1906), advocates teaching children 

from an early age the sexual facts of plant life and also 

concerning insects and other lower animals, and so gradually 

leading up to human beings, the matter being thus robbed of its 

unwholesome mystery. Mrs. Ennis Richmond (_Boyhood_, p. 62) 

recommends that children should be sent to spend some of their 

time upon a farm, so that they may not only become acquainted 

with the general facts of the natural world, but also with the 

sexual lives of animals, learning things which it is difficult to 

teach verbally. Karina Karin ("Wie erzieht man ein Kind zuer 


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