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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

gain his first knowledge of sexual difference from anatomical 

subjects, the dignity of death being a noble prelude to the 

knowledge of sex and depriving it forever of morbid prurience. 

It is scarcely necessary to remark that this method of teaching 

children the elements of sexual anatomy in the _post-mortem_ room 

has not found many advocates or followers; it is undesirable, for 

it fails to take into account the sensitiveness of children to 

such impressions, and it is unnecessary, for it is just as easy 

to teach the dignity of life as the dignity of death. 

 

The duty of the school to impart education in matters of sex to 

children has in recent years been vigorously and ably advocated 

by Maria Lischnewska (op. cit.), who speaks with thirty years' 

experience as a teacher and an intimate acquaintance with 

children and their home life. She argues that among the mass of 

the population to-day, while in the home-life there is every 

opportunity for coarse familiarity with sexual matters, there is 

no opportunity for a pure and enlightened introduction to them, 

parents being for the most part both morally and intellectually 

incapable of aiding their children here. That the school should 

assume the leading part in this task is, she believes, in 

accordance with the whole tendency of modern civilized life. She 

would have the instruction graduated in such a manner that during 

the fifth or sixth year of school life the pupil would receive 

instruction, with the aid of diagrams, concerning the sexual 

organs and functions of the higher mammals, the bull and cow 

being selected by preference. The facts of gestation would of 

course be included. When this stage was reached it would be easy 

to pass on to the human species with the statement: "Just in the 

same way as the calf develops in the cow so the child develops in 

the mother's body." 

 

It is difficult not to recognize the force of Maria Lischnewska's 

argument, and it seems highly probable that, as she asserts, the 

instruction proposed lies in the course of our present path of 

progress. Such instruction would be formal, unemotional, and 

impersonal; it would be given not as specific instruction in 

matters of sex, but simply as a part of natural history. It would 

supplement, so far as mere knowledge is concerned, the 

information the child had already received from its mother. But 

it would by no means supplant or replace the personal and 

intimate relationship of confidence between mother and child. 

That is always to be aimed at, and though it may not be possible 

among the ill-educated masses of to-day, nothing else will 

adequately take its place. 

 

There can be no doubt, however, that while in the future the school will 

most probably be regarded as the proper place in which to teach the 

elements of physiology--and not as at present a merely emasculated and 

effeminated physiology--the introduction of such reformed teaching is as 

yet impracticable in many communities. A coarse and ill-bred community 

moves in a vicious circle. Its members are brought up to believe that sex 

matters are filthy, and when they become adults they protest violently 

against their children being taught this filthy knowledge. The teacher's 

task is thus rendered at the best difficult, and under democratic 

conditions impossible. We cannot, therefore, hope for any immediate 

introduction of sexual physiology into schools, even in the unobtrusive 

form in which alone it could properly be introduced, that is to say as a 


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