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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

Apart from his interest in his origin, the child is also interested in his 

sexual, or as they seem to him exclusively, his excretory organs, and in 

those of other people, his sisters and parents. On these points, at this 

age, his mother may simply and naturally satisfy his simple and natural 

curiosity, calling things by precise names, whether the names used are 

common or uncommon being a matter in regard to which she may exercise her 

judgment and taste. In this manner the mother will, indirectly, be able to 

safeguard her child at the outset against the prudish and prurient notions 

alike which he will encounter later. She will also without unnatural 

stress be able to lead the child into a reverential attitude towards his 

own organs and so exert an influence against any undesirable tampering 

with them. In talking with him about the origin of life and about his own 

body and functions, in however elementary a fashion, she will have 

initiated him both in sexual knowledge and in sexual hygiene. 

 

The mother who establishes a relationship of confidence with her child 

during these first years will probably, if she possesses any measure of 

wisdom and tact, be able to preserve it even after the epoch of puberty 

into the difficult years of adolescence. But as an educator in the 

narrower sense her functions will, in most cases, end at or before 

puberty. A somewhat more technical and completely impersonal acquaintance 

with the essential facts of sex then becomes desirable, and this would 

usually be supplied by the school. 

 

 

The great though capricious educator, Basedow, to some extent a 

pupil of Rousseau, was an early pioneer in both the theory and 

the practice of giving school children instruction in the facts 

of the sexual life, from the age of ten onwards. He insists much 

on this subject in his great treatise, the _Elementarwerk_ 

(1770-1774). The questions of children are to be answered 

truthfully, he states, and they must be taught never to jest at 

anything so sacred and serious as the sexual relations. They are 

to be shown pictures of childbirth, and the dangers of sexual 

irregularities are to be clearly expounded to them at the outset. 

Boys are to be taken to hospitals to see the results of venereal 

disease. Basedow is aware that many parents and teachers will be 

shocked at his insistence on these things in his books and in his 

practical pedagogic work, but such people, he declares, ought to 

be shocked at the Bible (see, e.g., Pinloche, _La Reforme de 

l'Education en Allemagne au dixhuitieme siecle: Basedow et le 

Philanthropinisme_, pp. 125, 256, 260, 272). Basedow was too far 

ahead of his own time, and even of ours, to exert much influence 

in this matter, and he had few immediate imitators. 

 

Somewhat later than Basedow, a distinguished English physician, 

Thomas Beddoes, worked on somewhat the same lines, seeking to 

promote sexual knowledge by lectures and demonstrations. In his 

remarkable book, _Hygeia_, published in 1802 (vol. i, Essay IV) 

he sets forth the absurdity of the conventional requirement that 

"discretion and ignorance should lodge in the same bosom," and 

deals at length with the question of masturbation and the need of 

sexual education. He insists on the great importance of lectures 

on natural history which, he had found, could be given with 

perfect propriety to a mixed audience. His experiences had shown 

that botany, the amphibia, the hen and her eggs, human anatomy, 

even disease and sometimes the sight of it, are salutary from 

this point of view. He thinks it is a happy thing for a child to 


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