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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

 

There can be no doubt that, more especially in highly intelligent 

children with vague and unspecialized yet insistent sexual 

impulses, the artificial mystery with which sex is too often 

clothed not only accentuates the natural curiosity but also tends 

to favor the morbid intensity and even prurience of the sexual 

impulse. This has long been recognized. Dr. Beddoes wrote at the 

beginning of the nineteenth century: "It is in vain that we 

dissemble to ourselves the eagerness with which children of 

either sex seek to satisfy themselves concerning the conformation 

of the other. No degree of reserve in the heads of families, no 

contrivances, no care to put books of one description out of 

sight and to garble others, has perhaps, with any one set of 

children, succeeded in preventing or stifling this kind of 

curiosity. No part of the history of human thought would perhaps 

be more singular than the stratagems devised by young people in 

different situations to make themselves masters or witnesses of 

the secret. And every discovery, due to their own inquiries, can 

but be so much oil poured upon an imagination in flames" (T. 

Beddoes, _Hygeia_, 1802, vol. iii, p. 59). Kaan, again, in one of 

the earliest books on morbid sexuality, sets down mystery as one 

of the causes of _psychopathia sexualis_. Marro (_La Puberta_, p. 

299) points out how the veil of mystery thrown over sexual 

matters merely serves to concentrate attention on them. The 

distinguished Dutch writer Multatuli, in one of his letters 

(quoted with approval by Freud), remarks on the dangers of hiding 

things from boys and girls in a veil of mystery, pointing out 

that this must only heighten the curiosity of children, and so 

far from keeping them pure, which mere ignorance can never do, 

heats and perverts their imaginations. Mrs. Mary Wood Allen, 

also, warns the mother (op. cit., p. 5) against the danger of 

allowing any air of embarrassing mystery to creep over these 

things. "If the instructor feels any embarrassment in answering 

the queries of the child, he is not fitted to be the teacher, for 

the feeling of embarrassment will, in some subtle way, 

communicate itself to the child, and he will experience an 

indefinable sense of offended delicacy which is both unnecessary 

and undesirable. Purification of one's own thought is, then, the 

first step towards teaching the truth purely. Why," she adds, "is 

death, the gateway out of life, any more dignified or pathetic 

than birth, the gateway into life? Or why is the taking of 

earthly life a more awful fact than the giving of life?" Mrs. 

Ennis Richmond, in a book of advice to mothers which contains 

many wise and true things, says: "I want to insist, more strongly 

than upon anything else, that it is the _secrecy_ that surrounds 

certain parts of the body and their functions that gives them 

their danger in the child's thought. Little children, from 

earliest years, are taught to think of these parts of their body 

as mysterious, and not only so, but that they are mysterious 

because they are unclean. Children have not even a name for them. 

If you have to speak to your child, you allude to them 

mysteriously and in a half-whisper as 'that little part of you 

that you don't speak of,' or words to that effect. Before 

everything it is important that your child should have a good 

working name for these parts of his body, and for their 

functions, and that he should be taught to use and to hear the 


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